Aura 3 Plans

From the Aura blog:

  • The Past

    • Aura 1.x framework packages will see no new releases, and may be archived.

    • Aura 1.x library packages are near the end of active development; to prevent orphaning and end-of-life, ownership and authority over them they may be transferred to interested parties.

  • The Present

    • Aura 2.x packages that are currently stable will remain the center of development attention, with some modifications to Composer and PHPUnit support files, and with added testing on PHP 7.

    • Aura 2.x packages that are not currently stable will not see stable 2.x releases; they will become 3.x candidate packages.

  • The Future

    • Aura 3.x packages will target PHP 5.6, and additionally test on PHP 7.

    • Aura 3.x library packages will be allowed to depend on interface packages, though not other implementation packages.

    • Aura 3.x will not provide a framework under the Aura name, although the 2.x framework should be able to use 3.x components. Frameworks of Aura packages may be provided as separate projects.

    • Aura 3.x and later packages will have independent major version release cycles.

Read the entire post here.

Using Aura.Html with League\Plates

Aura has its own native PHP template package, Aura.View, a direct descendant of Savant and Solar_View, as well as a cousin to Zend_View.

The v1 Aura.View package used to include a helper system. Once we realized that there was no reason to tie the helper system directly to the view system, we released the helpers as a standalone Aura.Html package. This means the helpers can be used in any PHP presentation code, framework-based or otherwise.

As an example, let’s try integrating the helpers with Plates, a relative newcomer in the native PHP templating world. Plates allows you to register functions with its template engine, which means we can pull individual helpers out of Aura.Html and drop them into Plates, like so:

<?php
$plates = new League\Plates\Engine('/path/to/templates');
$helper = (new Aura\Html\HelperLocatorFactory())->newInstance();

$plates->registerFunction('anchor',     $helper->get('anchor'));
$plates->registerFunction('anchorRaw',  $helper->get('anchorRaw'));
$plates->registerFunction('base',       $helper->get('base'));
$plates->registerFunction('form',       $helper->get('form'));
$plates->registerFunction('img',        $helper->get('img'));
$plates->registerFunction('input',      $helper->get('input'));
$plates->registerFunction('label',      $helper->get('label'));
$plates->registerFunction('links',      $helper->get('links'));
$plates->registerFunction('metas',      $helper->get('metas'));
$plates->registerFunction('ol',         $helper->get('ol'));
$plates->registerFunction('scripts',    $helper->get('scripts'));
$plates->registerFunction('styles',     $helper->get('styles'));
$plates->registerFunction('tag',        $helper->get('tag'));
$plates->registerFunction('title',      $helper->get('title'));
$plates->registerFunction('ul',         $helper->get('ul'));
?>

Now you can use the tag helpers and form-building helpers from Aura.Html in your Plates templates. For example, if your Plates template looks like this …

<html>
<head>
<?= $this->title('My Title'); ?>
</head>
<body>
<p>Try out <?= $this->anchor(
    'https://github.com/auraphp/Aura.Html',
    'Aura.Html'
); ?>
with <?= $this->anchor(
    'http://platesphp.com',
    'Plates'
); ?> !</p>
</body>
</html>

… it will render to:

<html>
<head>
    <title>My Title</title>
</head>
<body>
<p>Try out <a href="https://github.com/auraphp/Aura.Html">Aura.Html</a>
with <a href="http://platesphp.com">Plates</a> !</p>
</body>
</html>

Try out Aura.Html today, and see how much you like it with your output system of choice. (We’re partial to Aura.View for that task, but then, we would be.)

UPDATE: As usual, Hari KT is ahead of the curve with his post on this same topic from a year ago: http://harikt.com/blog/2014/05/13/extending-plates-with-aura-html-helpers/.

UPDATE 2: Someone asked how easy it is to use Aura.Html with Aura.View. It’s 3-lines-easy: see https://github.com/auraphp/Aura.View#custom-helper-managers.

MLAPHP and N+1 Books: Half-Price Sale Starts Early!

I said a couple of days ago that the “Modernizing” and “N+1″ half-price bundle would go on sale Monday, but I finished sooner than I expected, so I’m starting the sale today. Go get the bundle here:

https://leanpub.com/b/mlasn1php

I also said that the price would be $23.99 ($39.99), but I did my math wrong. It’s actually $22.99 (suggested $28.99).

I love it when a project is early and under-budget!

A New Book About The N+1 Problem, and an Update to MLAPHP

I’ll have a new book finished and ready for you soon: Solving the N+1 Problem in PHP. Although I have written and spoken about the N+1 problem several times over the past few years, this book is an extended disstertation on the topic.

Describing the N+1 problem is one thing, and talking about the solutions in the abstract yet another. But how to diagnose and discover the problem, as well as refactoring strategies to resolve N+1 problems in your codebase? Those are something else, and they are what the new book provides, similar to the strategies I presented in Modernizing Legacy Applications in PHP. At about 40 pages of narrative and code, in many ways the new N+1 book serves as a topic-specific add-on to MLAPHP.

Speaking of which, MLAPHP is getting an update! The update is nothing extensive, mostly typo fixes and a couple of added details, all from attentive and interested readers. Current owners will receive the update for free.

So when will they be completed? Monday. And there’s a special deal involved for the week they’re finished.

MLAPHP is just about a year old, so to celebrate this new book, if you purchase both MLAPHP and the N+1 book as a bundle next week, they will each be about 50% off. That’s a total of $23.99 $22.99 (suggested $39.99 $28.99) for both books, with a 45-day money-back guarantee backed by Leanpub.

After the sale week, they’ll go back to their normal prices, so this is your chance to get a bigger bang for your buck. Of course, the new N+1 book is only $5.99 (suggested $7.99), so it’s not exactly a bank-breaker in the first place.

More updates when the new book and the update are finalized!

UPDATE (Fri 20 Mar): The bundle is now available at https://leanpub.com/b/mlasn1php. Go get it while you can!

Bookdown: DocBook-Like HTML Output From Markdown

From bookdown.io:

Bookdown generates DocBook-like HTML output using Markdown and JSON files instead of XML.

Bookdown is especially well-suited for publishing project documentation to > GitHub Pages.

Features include:

  • Automatic table-of-contents generation as index pages at each hierarchy level

  • Custom index-page titles via JSON configuration

  • Automatic numbering of page headings

  • Automatic previous/next/up navigation headers and footers

  • Multi-page hierarchical output

  • Loading of remote content files via HTTP

  • Templated output for theming

  • Overridable page processing, especially for rendering

Bookdown can be used as a static site generator, or as a way to publish static pages as a subdirectory in an existing site.

Continue reading

MVC and ADR are User-Interface Patterns, Not Application Architectures

N.b.: I am the author of the Action-Domain-Responder paper referenced in this article.

In his post on MVC alternatives (including Action-Domain-Responder), Anthony Ferrara makes a claim that is central to his discussion. While I agree with much he says in that and related articles, I believe that one claim is in error, and while it does not discredit the essay as a whole, replacing the erroneous claim with a more accurate one gives the essay a different flavor.

The central mistake I think Anthony makes is near the end of this post, where he states (in talking about MVC, ADR, et al.) that “All Pretend To Be Application Architectures.” That assertion strikes me as incorrect.

While it may be that developers using MVC may mistakenly think of MVC as an application architecture, the pattern description itself makes no such claim. Indeed, Fowler categorizes MVC as a “Web Presentation Pattern” and not as an “Application Architecture” per se.

Sure, MVC is described in book called “Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture”, but MVC itself is a presentation pattern within an application architecture. Here’s another example of the distinction: we would not call “Table Data Gateway” an application architecture, even though it too appears in the same book. It is a data source pattern within an application architecture.

Fowler’s categorization and description of MVC define it pretty clearly as a user interface pattern. ADR, as a refinement of MVC, is likewise a user interface pattern. Neither is an application architecture in and of itself, although they are the outermost part of an application architecture. So when Anthony’s article states elsewhere that ADR’s “coupling to HTTP that it becomes difficult to make a non-HTTP interface” my response is “Well, obviously – it’s a user interface pattern centered around HTTP.”

Anthony then goes on to say:

And that’s the biggest reason all of these “patterns”, “architectures” and “concepts” are a bad joke. They solve the easy problem, and throw the hard problem over the fence.

MVC, ADR, et al., solve a user-interface problem. That may be an easy problem for Anthony to solve, but to say that user-interface patterns “throw the hard problem over the fence” strikes me as starting from the wrong set of expectations. MVC and ADR, as user-interface patterns, aren’t supposed to be dealing with core business logic in the first place.

It might be better to say that the underlying application that is presented through the user interface is not really the user interface’s problem in the first place. The user interface code probably should not care too much about the internal operation of the underlying application code. If it does, then the application code is bubbling up too far into the user interface.

In summary, I think the assertion that “All Pretend To Be Application Architectures” is just not an accurate categorization. It would more correct to say that “All Are User Interface Patterns, Not Entire Application Architectures” – or, even better, that “Developers Frequently Misunderstand Them To Be Application Architectures”.

This is why you should always use braces on conditionals

In issue 65 on Aura.Router, Optional parameters not working as expected?, we can see that the problem was this piece of code from the issue reporter:

if(isset($this->route->params["id"]))
    echo "id = " . $this->route->params["id"] . "<br><br>";
if(isset($this->route->params["function"]))
    echo "function = " . $this->route->params["function"] . "<br><br>";
if(isset($this->route->params["third"]));
    echo "third = " . $this->route->params["third"] . "<br><br>";

Look at that last if statement: it ends in a semicolon. Although the line beneath it that is *intended* to be the body of the if statement, as indicated by the indentation, it is *not* the body of the if statement. It gets executed no matter the outcome of the if condition.

That kind of thing is really tough to debug.

Instead, if we use braces on all conditionals, regardless of how short or long the body is, we get this:

if(isset($this->route->params["id"])) {
    echo "id = " . $this->route->params["id"] . "<br><br>";
}

if(isset($this->route->params["function"])) {
    echo "function = " . $this->route->params["function"] . "<br><br>";
}

if(isset($this->route->params["third"])) {
}

echo "third = " . $this->route->params["third"] . "<br><br>";

Then it’s very easy to see what’s going wrong.

That is one reason Aura adheres to PSR-2; it incorporates that rule, along with many others, that makes it easier to know what to expect when reading code. Anything unexpected becomes a signal that something may be wrong.

What’s The Difference Between A “Pivot Table” And An “Association Table”?

An “association table” is a table that joins other tables in a many-to-many relationship. For example, if an Article can have more than one Tag, and each Tag can be placed on one or more Articles, then they are in a many-to-many relationship. To associate them to each other, we need a third table through which we can join them.

-- one end of a many-to-many relationship
CREATE TABLE article (
    article_id INT,
    title VARCHAR(255),
    body TEXT
);

-- the other end of a many-to-many relationship
CREATE TABLE tag (
    tag_id INT,
    name VARCHAR(255)
);

-- an association table mapping articles and tags to each other
CREATE TABLE article_tag (
    article_tag_id INT,
    article_id INT,
    tag_id INT
);

In ORM terms, we might say each Article “has many” Tags “through” the ArticleTag association, that each Tag also “has many” Articles “through” the ArticleTag, and finally that each ArticleTag “belongs to” an Article and that it “belongs to” a Tag.

When writing SQL to find the Tags for an Article, or to find all the Articles that use a specific Tag, we join the ArticlesTags table to get the associated entity IDs. The SQL looks something like the following:

-- select all the tags for an article
SELECT tag.*
FROM tag
JOIN article_tag ON article_tag.tag_id = tag.tag_id
WHERE article_tag.article_id = ?

-- select all the articles that use a tag
SELECT article.*
FROM article
JOIN article_tag ON article_tag.article_id = article.article_id
WHERE article_tag.tag_id = ?

This pattern is called an association table mapping.

On the other hand, a “pivot table” is a cross-tabulation query, frequently used in spreadsheets. You can see more about pivot tables through Google. In short, the idea is to build a query, and convert the rows into columns by grouping the rows in a particular way. These kinds of queries generally involve some conditionals and calculations to group the query results; you can see some examples here.

In summary: if you are joining tables to each other in a many-to-many relationship, the table that maps the relationship is an association table. If you are doing a cross-tabulation to convert rows into columns, you are working with pivot table.

What’s The Difference Between Tightly-, Loosely-, and De-Coupled ?

In a tweetstorm that spun up late last week, Taylor Otwell produced the following commentary:

look guys I’m “decoupled” because this package doesn’t have composer dependencies!!! HAHAHAHA LOL

how many composer packages a given package has does NOT affect YOUR code’s decoupling.

that is a matter of programming to an interface, etc.

you people seriously do not understand decoupling. at all.

if you type hint AuraAnything that is a HARD, CONCRETE dependency. THAT is coupling.

IlluminateContracts are all interfaces. abstractions. not concretions. THAT’s decoupling.

IlluminateContractsViewFactory could be a Laravel view factory, could be an Aura one. That’s decoupling.

how many composer pkgs the IMPLEMENTOR needs is an implementation detail my consuming code need not care about

consuming code ONLY cares about programming to an interface for decoupling.

you [@philsturgeon] and brandon [savage] and paul [jones] don’t understand basic programming concepts like coupling

and think somehow coupling is tied to composer

Aura ships hard concretions = you are tightly coupled to Aura.

which should my consuming code give a shit if Aura is decoupled AMONGST ITSELF. Nobody gives a shit.

i only care if MY code is coupled to Aura.

and since Aura makes you depends on hard concretions, it promotes hard couplings.

I’m saying if you type-hint a class dependency, you are coupled to that implementation (cont)

regardless of that package’s internal dependencies

While some of Taylor’s rant is correct for as far as it goes, much of it glosses over important distinctions in subtle misdirection, and the remainder displays some misunderstandings. He is also flat wrong in his assertions of other peoples’ understanding of “basic programming terminology.” As such, I think his words demand a careful response for future reference.

First, I’m glad to see Taylor paying attention to the proper use of terminology in a software context. This is something he’s not always been great at in the past, and I encourage him here.

But I can’t quite tell if Taylor thinks the developers who use Aura believe their code is decoupled by virtue of using Aura. Or maybe it’s that the Aura marketing phrase “fully decoupled libraries” is the target of his ire. I infer allusions to both from his tweets, so I’ll attempt to address both possibilities. (Perhaps there is some other interpretation I have missed.)

It should be so obvious as to not require stating, but for the sake of explicitness: If your code has a dependency on classes in a particular thrid-party package, your code is tightly coupled to the code in that package. This is true for any classes in any library, framework, or other package code. So, if you believe that depending on an Aura library in your code makes your code “decoupled” then you are mistaken. As far as I know, I have never attempted to state or imply otherwise. I don’t think any Aura users have this misperception, but if so, consider this a corrective.

The fact that your code could be tightly coupled to another package does not mean that the other package is coupled to anything else. That is to say, the other package might have no couplings of any sort to any other code outside itself. The other package in that case is de-coupled.

The Aura library packages are designed with that kind of decoupling in mind. That is, no Aura library package depends on anything at all in any other Aura package. Each of the Aura libraries is thus fully decoupled from the others, and incidentally from any framework that is composed of them. (Note that the *_Kernel and *_Project packages are coupled to other packages; the decoupling principle applies only to the Aura library packages.)

But why would you care if a particular library package is itself decoupled from other packages? I assert that one reason (of many) you want libraries that are themselves decoupled is so that, if you have to swap one out in your own code, you only have to worry about the one library, not about all the dependent libraries that it is coupled to (and all the dependent libraries they are coupled to). Swapping out is still tedious: you will need to work through your code, change all the typehints from that library’s classes to those in another, and change all the injections that specify classes from the library. But at least it’s only the one library; the fact that the library is itself decoupled reduces the swapping-out work.

Taylor points out another level of coupling called “loose” coupling. This means that, instead of your code depending on a particular class, you instead depend on an interface. This couples you to the interface, but not to any particular implementation. If your code depends on interfaces, your code is loosely coupled to the implementations of those interfaces (although I don’t think this means you are de-coupled – there’s still some knowledge necessary for interactions).

Being loosely coupled is a good situation to be in compared to being tightly coupled. If you need to swap out an implementation of an interface, you won’t need to change your typehints (unless you swap to another set of interfaces). However, you will still need to change all your injections to the new implementation. Overall, being loosely coupled makes for less work when swapping out libraries.

How can you tell if a package is coupled to another package? Provided that composer.json is not lying, it’s easy enough to examine the “require” element to see if there are other packages listed there. If there are, then it seems likely that the package is coupled to whatever is required. You need to exercise a little judgment, though. If the required package contains only interfaces, then the coupling is “loose”. Otherwise, it is “tight”. If there are no other required packages at all, then the package has no coupling of any sort; it is fully decoupled from anything outside of it.

However, that’s only if you assume composer.json is not lying. To really discover the coupling of a particular package, you would need to examine its code. Any uses of interfaces defined outside the package indicates loose coupling, uses of classes defined outside the package indicates tight coupling, and no uses of interfaces or classes outside the package indicates full decoupling.

(Note that this discussion is of inter-package coupling. Even if the classes inside a package may still be coupled to each other, the package as a whole may still be decoupled from any other package.)

Having said all this, Taylor is trying out a “contracts” package that exposes the Laravel interfaces independently of the implementations. I think this is a neat idea. It’s the only truly new thing I’ve seen introduced to the PHP community by the Laravel codebase, and I think it is worthy of emulation.

Even so, if the “contracts” include anything besides interfaces, I think coupling to them might be defined as “tight”. I am thinking specifically of the Exception classes included in the “contracts” package. Although it may be fair to think that Exceptions are exempt from coupling rules, perhaps they would be better provided as interfaces to Exceptions, instead of classes proper. I will reserve my judgment on that for a later time.

First Aura 2.0 Stable Project Releases!

Exciting news! After a little over a year in the making, the Aura web and CLI project packages saw their first stable 2.0 releases this weekend. This is a major milestone for Aura, as it means not just the core libraries but also the frameworks built from them are now complete.

Because Aura takes a “libraries first, framework second” approach, the project packages had to wait for the following 2.0 stable releases of these core libraries yesterday:

  • Aura.Di (a dependency injection container)
  • Aura.Web (web request/response objects, and a response sender)

Once those were stable, it was not much trouble to promote the various kernels and project skeletons to stable as well:

(Unlike Aura library packages, which have no dependencies because they are completely decoupled from each other, the *_Kernel and *_Project packages do have dependencies, as they are compositions of library and other packages.)

Read more on the Aura blog, including other library releases: First 2.0 Stable Project Releases!.