Laravel Keeps Using That Word — I Do Not Think It Means What They Think It Means

By | March 5, 2014

One of the things that we do by defining design patterns is we create a common language that we can use to explain and express ourselves. When I say to you “I used an Adapter” or “I implemented the Factory pattern”, that should conjure up a specific image in your mind of object relationships and behaviors, even if you don’t know my specific use case or problem domain.

When we use these terms incorrectly, we not only devalue them, we confuse developers. For one of the most up-and-coming frameworks to use a technical term so incorrectly is disturbing. It breaks down the vocabulary that technical people use to communicate with each other, because there are now two very different definitions floating around with the same name.

Of course, Laravel’s Facades are in fact well-designed proxies implementing the Proxy Pattern. There’s nothing wrong with that: as a developer, it’s up to you to decide how and what patterns you’re willing to accept in your framework, and to write your application however you wish. All I ask is that we stop calling them Facades.

Hear hear. Via Let’s Talk About Facades | BrandonSavage.net.

One thought on “Laravel Keeps Using That Word — I Do Not Think It Means What They Think It Means

  1. Heikki Naski

    One of the main points of patterns is the forming of a common language which would help communication. It’s all too common for people to use the words adapter, facade or proxy just to sound fancy instead of actually communicating important details of an implementation.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *